LANDSCAPE LIGHTING WORLD® FORUMS

Fixture and beam width for Front/Sides of House

Discussion in 'Ask' started by Shane, Aug 16, 2019.

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  1. Shane

    Shane New Member

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    D95F8B77-17D9-44F8-934C-E0DD32AC14EB.jpeg 747524CD-0DDF-4B89-90E6-0A22D47E151C.jpeg Hey guys, I’d like to illuminate the front and sides of my home but not sure what fixtures and beam widths would be best. Thanks in advance!
     
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  2. Mesodude

    Mesodude Member

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    Welcome, Shane. I’ve attached a few diagrammed duplicates of your photos indicating some possible lighting options. Obviously the extent to which you find my recommendations useful will depend on your personal preferences and your available wiring and mounting options. On the left front section of your house (with the half moon window), I believe any of the spotlights (All Star, Top Dog, Fat Boy, or Lusitano) should work for you. To avoid light trespass, I think a 38° beam spread is probably the max you’d want to use there. Though I think it could look great, I’m sort of on the fence as far as lighting the siding on the gable above that window. If there is a way to light that in a way that you could conceal the fixture without too much difficulty, I’d probably go with either a Woodsman or All Star downlight with a beam spread of no more than 60°. Evan will correct me if I’m wrong but I believe one of these has a longer shroud option than the other. If so, that would be my choice (for its added glare protection).


    On the front right side of the house, I’d recommend lighting the areas indicated. I’d use one of the two downlights I mentioned above, a 38° beam spread, and again, I’d go for the fixture with the longer shroud option. Alternatively (or additionally), you could mount two or three downlights (same beam spread) above the garage. Actually, as long as you can conceal the fixture and wiring fairly well, I see no reason why you couldn’t use any of the downlights (including the All Star or Tommy lights in that area above the garage doors. For that matter, you could even mount a couple of Up/Down Integrated LED Deck Lights above the garage (which would illuminate the area above and the ground below. Ultimately, you’ll have to decide based on your wiring/mounting options and the overall effect you want.


    Finally, if you are concerned about leaving the middle facade of the house in the dark, I’d consider placing one of the mini path lights (one whose top extends no higher than the bottom of that lower window’s frame) in that raised bed. If you needed that area even brighter (while avoiding the light trespass spotlights or floodlights would likely create), you could even opt for a strategically placed pagoda fixture. In the absence of any other lighting, this approach would help outline the dark wood frame of that raised bed, it would highlight your shrubs and garden ornaments, and the facade would be softly illuminated by the indirect light from the path light fixture. Anyway, I hope you find some of my recommendations helpful.
     

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  3. Evan Kruk

    Evan Kruk Online Liaison Staff Member

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    Awesome recommendations @Mesodude ! :D Definitely a good house for some downlights. I also think path lights would look great in those garden beds as well.

    The Woodsman would offer an adjustable shroud and additional shrouds are also available separately if needed. @Shane , you could also consider using Puck Lights. They are easy to surface mount with the pre-drilled screw holes and the low-profile style of them would help to preserve the cozy/natural feel of your home by keeping light sources mostly hidden.

    @Mesodude hit the nail on the head as far as preferences go; it will be the biggest determiner of your fixtures and installation. Are there any particular styles of lights you like and want to use (maybe a decorative bollard for example)? Or, maybe you want to use all ground-stake lights for a simple, drill-free installation? You definitely have some options with your home; any could really look beautiful as well.
     
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  4. Shane

    Shane New Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions! The house is on 7 acres and there are really big trees in the front I’d like to do as well but I’d like to focus on just the house first as it’s really dark out here. I have a 300 watt Kichler transformer and 5 of their path lights similar to the Volt Max Spread Path light but they are not led which I’d like to convert as well. If I did the All Star or Top Dog on the right side of the house up top could I use 3 puck lights just above the garage door. Seems like those spot lamps would reach the ground and 3 more spot lamps above the garage door would be overkill? Thanks again
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
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  5. Mesodude

    Mesodude Member

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    Hi, Shane. The fixtures illuminating upper level sections of that wall would also broadcast pools of light onto the ground. However, the overhang above the garage would cut off the beams of light, casting a large shadow below and preventing those fixtures from evenly illuminating the garage door and siding below. The approach I recommended would broadcast light onto the garage door and the siding on either side of the door. Again, ultimately, the final layout is up to you.
     
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  6. Evan Kruk

    Evan Kruk Online Liaison Staff Member

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    I'm not particularly familiar with the Kichler transformers but, as long as it has an output of 12V AC (alternating current) it is fine to use with our LEDs. For the pre-existing lights you also have, maybe check to see if it is possible to simply swap out the bulbs for LED ones if possible; it would prevent you from having to buy more lights or move lights you're already happy with.

    I'd recommend the BuddyPro Plus for the puck lights above the garage door (2-3 fixtures total depending on the level of brightness you're looking for). I'm not quite sure I follow what you mean by using spotlights on the second story; were you meaning to downlight with them from the gutter or uplight with a surface mount drilled in directly above the garage door? But @Mesodude is correct that the downlights up top would also reach the ground other than the door area where they would be cut off by the ledge.
     
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  7. Shane

    Shane New Member

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    Ordered 9 G2 Fat Boys for around the house and to downlight the tallest part over the garage door. I wish I waited to read your all’s reply’s as I ordered 3 Buddy Pro puck lights for above the garage door. Didn’t even see the Buddy Pro Plus. Is the light output that much greater with the “Plus” version? I got the Buddy Pro’s in 2700K.
     
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  8. Mesodude

    Mesodude Member

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    Hi, Shane. A couple things... First, at 300 lumens, the Buddy Pro Plus is 3 times as bright as the the Buddy Pro. If you think you'd prefer the Pro Plus (which Evan recommended), then you might want to exchange them. Also, Fat Boys are primarily used for uplighting. As suggested above, for the best glare prevention, you'd want to use either the All Star downlight or the Woodsman downlight on the upper portions of the house. Hope this helps.
     
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  9. Evan Kruk

    Evan Kruk Online Liaison Staff Member

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    @Shane I recommended the brighter of the puck lights as there are no garage lights currently and, personally, I'd prefer the brighter more functional light in/around my garage. The "standard" 2700k version that you already ordered will also look great the output will just be much more subtle; more of accent lights. Also, if I read correctly, I'd stress caution trying to use spotlights for downlighting. Spotlights are naturally designed with different water drainage features than downlights which is why most designers & manufacturers would advise against it as you may run into some issues using them in that manner.
     
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  10. Mesodude

    Mesodude Member

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    Thanks for clarifying, Evan. I’d read that the downlights were designed to prevent water intrusion when directed downward but when responding to Shane, I forgot that there are protected or relatively protected situations where fixtures choice is less crucial.
     
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  11. Shane

    Shane New Member

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    I’m returning the Buddy Pro’s for the “plus” version. The 2 Fatboys I’m using for downlights are completely covered by the roof overhang. They will see no moisture at all. Thanks again for all your help guys, I’ll post pictures once it’s done
     
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